ABOUT OUR CLAY and CLAY BASICS

THE STUDIO CLAY BODY
that we use in Ceramics 1 is a sculptural,  “low fire” reddish earthenware body… earthenware is known for being a porous clay when fired (not yet vitrified), so often there is a range of suitable firing temperatures. This will make more sense after I explain the terms lower in this section.

bisque temp: c06
vitrification: c1

We will reclaim all large, clean and dry scraps of the studio body to reclaim. We will then remix the reclaim once it sits submerged in water and slacked.

OTHER CLAY BODIES

•    STONEWARE brown/buff
•    PORCELAIN white and sometimes translucent
•    EARTHENWARE – lower fire clay body often reddish in color due to addition of Iron. More porous.

 

OTHER TERMS:
MATURATION/VITRIFY/VITRIFICATION – the temperature at which the silica in clay bodies and glazes or vitrify

VITRIFICATION: is a process of converting a material into a glass-like amorphous solid which is free of any crystalline structure

WEDGING the clay:
Kneading the clay to make consistent and hopefully remove any air pockets.

SCORING the clay:
Making the edges of your joints very “hairy” and rough. Done before SLIPPING. Scoring increases and complicates the surface of the joint.

SLIP
Slip is a very runny mixture of your clay body. You should always use slip that was made from the clay body that you are building with.

DEMOS
Pinch pot
Coil building
Solid building
Soft slab
Slab using the slab roller
HARD SLAB

GREEN CLAY:
Clay that has not been fired

BISQUE WARE: Clay that ha been fired to a lower temperature, so that it is stable and is ready for glazing, but is not vitirified.

MATURED/GLAZE FIRED:
Clay that has been fired and or glazed to the clay body’s maturing temperature.

Stages of GREEN clay working:
Wet – when the clay is still movable.
Leather hard – when much of the water has evaporated from the clay body. This is the ideal time to carve clay with tools.
BONE DRY- work should only be loaded into the kiln for firing when it is bone dry. Bone dry work, when held up to your cheek should feel room temperature, not cool.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*

*