St. Lawrence University has been increasingly attacked by “phishing emails,” which attempt to garner personal information by tricking individuals. The repercussions of the phishing, however, have magnified across St. Lawrence, affecting both those who have responded and those who have not responded to the phishing emails. Rhett Thatcher, manager of St. Lawrence’s server group at […]

A group of faculty is proposing to add a sustainability requirement to St. Lawrence’s distribution requirements. Proponents hope to expose St. Lawrence students to the interdependence of humans and the natural system. Simultaneously, advocates of the sustainability requirement believe that a course focused on sustainability will help St. Lawrence create a cohesive marketing image for […]

The St. Lawrence Admissions Office mailed out the last enrollment decisions on Friday, March 16, marking the conclusion of the first year of its new admissions policy. The Policy was enacted to reduce the University’s deficit. The long-term implications of the new policy, which will ultimately admit more students, particularly more full-tuition students, are controversial. […]

With the recent increase in gasoline prices, the Keystone XL Pipeline has become a prominent political issue, which has accentuated the differences in conservative and liberal perspectives on how the pipeline will affect gasoline prices, the job market, and the environment. According to conservatives, the 1,700-mile pipeline from Alberta, Canada, to Texas refineries, would create […]

Public speeches and meetings are vital aspects of journalism, as “many news stories report what important or interesting people say in speeches or the actions people take at public meetings” (Bender et al. 323). Journalists, however, only report on the most newsworthy speeches and meetings. In fact, many news organizations publish two stories on important […]

Using Quotations

February 27, 2012 | 365 Comments

Journalists must provide information to a wide audience, while continuing to be coherent and interesting. To effectively do this, journalists utilize different writing styles—the inverted-pyramid, the hourglass, the focus, and the narrative—depending on the story. While introductory students are commonly taught to rely on the inverted pyramid, as it allows them to decipher between what […]

Writing the Body

February 19, 2012 | 46 Comments

Journalists must provide information to a wide audience, while continuing to be coherent and interesting. To effectively do this, journalists utilize different writing styles—the inverted-pyramid, the hourglass, the focus, and the narrative—depending on the story. While introductory students are commonly taught to rely on the inverted pyramid, as it allows them to decipher between what […]

The Lead

February 12, 2012 | 87 Comments

Journalists have the daunting task of capturing readers’ attention, while maintaining credibility. To effectively do this, journalists present the most interesting and newsworthy aspects of the story in the first paragraph or two, which is commonly referred to as “the lead” (Bender et al. 148). A well-written lead presents the central point of the article, […]

Reporting Simply

February 5, 2012 | 31 Comments

Thomas Jefferson, a founding father, believed newspapers were a vital aspect of democracy—he even considered them potentially more important than democracy itself. He did specify, however, that every man “must be capable of reading them”. With that being said, journalists have the very difficult job of making complex news stories comprehendible for a wide audience, […]

What Is Newsworthy?

January 29, 2012 | 1,180 Comments

Mainstream media is a complex institution comprised of delicate rules to preserve quality, credibility, and relevance. Utilizing six fundamental requirements for every news story—timeliness, impact, prominence, proximity, unusualness, and conflict or controversy—journalists hope to compile informative, interesting, and—most importantly—objective stories. The New York Times, a prominent source of information for affluent Americans, seems to have […]

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